Another week, another Teen Wolf. This week’s episode has two main focuses: first, all the hoopla surrounding the decoded deadpool, and secondly, a stress-ridden lacrosse scrimmage against none other than the school Liam was expelled from.
(Might I take this time to point out that Danny was both excellent at codebreaking and is on the lacrosse team? Fuck you, Jeff Davis.)
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Another week, another Teen Wolf. This week’s episode has two main focuses: first, all the hoopla surrounding the decoded deadpool, and secondly, a stress-ridden lacrosse scrimmage against none other than the school Liam was expelled from.

(Might I take this time to point out that Danny was both excellent at codebreaking and is on the lacrosse team? Fuck you, Jeff Davis.)

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"'My name is Robert but I would prefer that you call me Bob.' It's just like that. You know what I mean? And if you were to insist upon calling that person Robert, you would be a colossal dick."

Paul F. Tompkins, succinctly explaining why you call people what they want to be called, whether it’s “little people” or “transgender” or “chairperson” or “Bob”. It’s not about being politically correct and it’s not about you. It’s about basic decency and respect.  (via ericmortensen)

The Boxtrolls premieres in September and I could not be more excited about it. Laika, the studio behind the film, has a history of consistently awesome movies (Coraline and Paranorman, to name a few), and their stop-motion animation skills are on a level no one else can hope to touch.

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petitsirena:

sticks and stones may break my bones, but language dictates everything from social norms to legislation and it’s indeed often used to bolster violence and oppression sooOo

Recently I’ve been watching my brother run through another round of Final Fantasy X. Personally, I’ve never been very into the series (except for X-2, but I think I’m in the minority there). However, seeing as it’s hailed as one of the masterpieces of the franchise, I’m more than willing to watch my brother go from temple to temple gaining summon spirits (or “aeons”, I guess) until the final summoning. It’s all very interesting and Tidus isn’t nearly as annoying as I imagined him being, but as he continues fighting through Sin spawn and other various baddies one thought has been ringing through my mind: being a white mage sucks. Not only in Spira—in many Final Fantasy games it seems as though if you’re a practitioner of the healing white magic you’re stuck healing and only healing—unless you’re also a summoner (which only aids this trope, but I’m getting ahead of myself).
Of course, this isn’t anything new; these limitations of the white mage far extend outside of the world of Final Fantasy into other JRPGs. A white mage, in addition to replacing combat expertise with that sweet healing magic, is almost always a woman. A “pure”-seeming woman (aka virginal). Ace spoke about one of the outliers (who just so happens to be in another Final Fantasy game) in a previous article, but the trend at large still stands. Yet, in more recent titles, it seems as though developers have taken it upon themselves to finally twist this trope for the better.
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Recently I’ve been watching my brother run through another round of Final Fantasy X. Personally, I’ve never been very into the series (except for X-2, but I think I’m in the minority there). However, seeing as it’s hailed as one of the masterpieces of the franchise, I’m more than willing to watch my brother go from temple to temple gaining summon spirits (or “aeons”, I guess) until the final summoning. It’s all very interesting and Tidus isn’t nearly as annoying as I imagined him being, but as he continues fighting through Sin spawn and other various baddies one thought has been ringing through my mind: being a white mage sucks. Not only in Spira—in many Final Fantasy games it seems as though if you’re a practitioner of the healing white magic you’re stuck healing and only healing—unless you’re also a summoner (which only aids this trope, but I’m getting ahead of myself).

Of course, this isn’t anything new; these limitations of the white mage far extend outside of the world of Final Fantasy into other JRPGs. A white mage, in addition to replacing combat expertise with that sweet healing magic, is almost always a woman. A “pure”-seeming woman (aka virginal). Ace spoke about one of the outliers (who just so happens to be in another Final Fantasy game) in a previous article, but the trend at large still stands. Yet, in more recent titles, it seems as though developers have taken it upon themselves to finally twist this trope for the better.

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bookishandi:

jennyquantums:

themyskira:

Wonder Woman vol. 2 #210

              

WAIT, THIS DOESN’T SHOW JUST HOW AWESOME DIANA IS.

This is from ruckawriter's run on WW (the best ever, imho). Medusa turns one of Diana's employees into stone (Diana is a full-on ambassador as well as superhero) and then challenges Diana to a fight. Diana is skeptical, but Aphrodite pretty much says, “Listen, we're not gonna take this shit from Medusa, you gotta fight her.” So Diana shows up pretty ready, blindfold, armor, all that. But it turns out Medusa has manipulated the event to be televised, so that after she defeats Diana, she can look into the screen and turn all the people watching into stone. 

Just TAKE THIS SHIT IN FOR A HOT SECOND (all images courtesy of scans_daily)

Then the stuff above happens. YES, BITCHES, DIANA—WHO HAS RECENTLY HAD A SWORD RUN THROUGH ONE OF HER KIDNEYS— TAKES ONE OF THE SNAKES SHE CUT OFF MEDUSA’S HEAD WHILE BLINDFOLDED AND SQUIRTS THE POISON IN HER EYES SO SHE IS BLIND SO MEDUSA CAN’T FUCK WITH HER.

Why? BECAUSE SAVING AND AVENGING EVEN ONE MORTAL LIFE IS WORTH HER OWN GODDAMN VISION THAT’S WHY. 

But after that badass “Never?” THIS PHOTO SET LEAVES OUT THE BEST PART. WONDER WOMAN IMMEDIATELY CHOPS OFF MEDUSA’S HEAD. NO HESITATION. NO NEGOTIATION. NO DESTROYING A WHOLE CITY JUST TO BEAT HER UP A LITTLE MORE. CHOP AND DONE.

And then?

DROP THAT MIC, DI.

DROP IT LIKE THE MAGMA-HOT SHIT THAT IT IS. 

To Rucka’s credit, this wasn’t no false-ass sacrifice, either. She stays blind AND STILL SAVES EVERYONE’S ASSES.

How does she get her sight back? She does something for Athena and Athena grants her one boon. So what does our Diana do? Ask for her sight back?

NOPE. SHE ASKS FOR LIFE TO BE RETURNED TO A CHILD KILLED BY MEDUSA.

And Athena was like, “Shit, Wonder Woman, you’re better than all of us, I guess you can have your sight back, too.” And Diana’s pretty much like, “Fine, that’s cool I guess, I was still getting shit done without it.”

THIS IS WHY I HAVE A LOT OF GODDAMN FEELINGS ABOUT WONDER WOMAN.

I’m always looking for new YA books to read, but recently, everything I’ve found seems to about old plots spun in, well, uninteresting ways. That is, until a friend told me about Otherbound, the recently released, rollicking debut novel by Corinne Duyvis. The most interesting thing about Otherbound? The mysterious connection between Nolan and Amara.
Ever since he was very young, Nolan Santiago has been told he has a rare form of epilepsy—one that comes with both visual and auditory hallucinations. But he knows that’s not really the case. Each and every time he closes his eyes, whether it’s just blinking during the day or while sleeping, he sees through the eyes of a girl, Amara, who lives in a different world entirely. He can experience everything she experiences. At first, that seems like it could be fun: Amara is a mage who can heal all damage done to her own body, which is why she was chosen as a servant to guard and protect the outcast princess Cilla. However, Cilla has been cursed by rogue forces who don’t want her to return to her throne—if she spills even one drop of blood, the earth itself will reach out and kill her. Here’s where it sucks for Nolan: every time Cilla gets injured and Amara draws Cilla’s curse toward herself, every time the earth crushes Amara’s bones and forces the breath from her lungs, Nolan feels it. Amara isn’t aware of him, but Nolan feels the pain as if it’s happening to himself. And he can’t do a thing about it—until one day, he can.
Slight spoilers for Otherbound below.
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I’m always looking for new YA books to read, but recently, everything I’ve found seems to about old plots spun in, well, uninteresting ways. That is, until a friend told me about Otherbound, the recently released, rollicking debut novel by Corinne Duyvis. The most interesting thing about Otherbound? The mysterious connection between Nolan and Amara.

Ever since he was very young, Nolan Santiago has been told he has a rare form of epilepsy—one that comes with both visual and auditory hallucinations. But he knows that’s not really the case. Each and every time he closes his eyes, whether it’s just blinking during the day or while sleeping, he sees through the eyes of a girl, Amara, who lives in a different world entirely. He can experience everything she experiences. At first, that seems like it could be fun: Amara is a mage who can heal all damage done to her own body, which is why she was chosen as a servant to guard and protect the outcast princess Cilla. However, Cilla has been cursed by rogue forces who don’t want her to return to her throne—if she spills even one drop of blood, the earth itself will reach out and kill her. Here’s where it sucks for Nolan: every time Cilla gets injured and Amara draws Cilla’s curse toward herself, every time the earth crushes Amara’s bones and forces the breath from her lungs, Nolan feels it. Amara isn’t aware of him, but Nolan feels the pain as if it’s happening to himself. And he can’t do a thing about it—until one day, he can.

Slight spoilers for Otherbound below.

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tinawarriorprincess:

psychmajorpizzamaker:

fight-0ff-yourdem0ns:

optimus-primette:

stunningpicture:

He designed this special shoes, shared between him and his paralyzed daughter just to make her feel the sensation of walking.




This is a wonderful invention, but the man in the picture is one of the testers. He is not the inventor. The inventor was an Israeli woman named Debby Elnatan who developed this with an Irish company for her son.

tinawarriorprincess:

psychmajorpizzamaker:

fight-0ff-yourdem0ns:

optimus-primette:

stunningpicture:

He designed this special shoes, shared between him and his paralyzed daughter just to make her feel the sensation of walking.

This is a wonderful invention, but the man in the picture is one of the testers. He is not the inventor. The inventor was an Israeli woman named Debby Elnatan who developed this with an Irish company for her son.

asaaf00:

Hayao Miyazaki talking about his passion for animation while seeing the world through his fascinating career. From the documentary: The Kingdom of Dreams and Madness (2013)