reeku-kun:

asami will fuck you up and look flawless doing it

I’m a huge fan of the Sonic the Hedgehog franchise, if that wasn’t clear to anyone who has read my work. For the most part, I enjoy the games, the comics, the movies, pretty much anything they produce. But, admittedly, time hasn’t been good to the franchise. Given that the series has gone on as long as it has, there is no shortage of criticism towards the blue hedgehog and his pals. However, most of these arguments take place in the space of the games, and I think the comics deserve some place in the discussion.
Mild, older spoilers for some Sonic games ahead.
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I’m a huge fan of the Sonic the Hedgehog franchise, if that wasn’t clear to anyone who has read my work. For the most part, I enjoy the games, the comics, the movies, pretty much anything they produce. But, admittedly, time hasn’t been good to the franchise. Given that the series has gone on as long as it has, there is no shortage of criticism towards the blue hedgehog and his pals. However, most of these arguments take place in the space of the games, and I think the comics deserve some place in the discussion.

Mild, older spoilers for some Sonic games ahead.

Read More

"

Luke Cage was created in 1972.

Four years earlier, in 1968, Martin Luther King, Jr. was shot and killed.

Five years before that, in 1963, Medgar Evers was shot and killed.

Eight years before that, in 1955, a young Black man named Emmett Till was tortured, then shot and killed.

These events, and numerous others with frightening similarity, happened in a line, and in the early years of the first decade to reap the social benefits of the Civil Rights Movement, Marvel Comics gives the fans (and the world) a Black male superhero whose primary superhuman aspect… is that he’s bulletproof.

Not flight, or super speed, or a power ring.

The superhuman ability of being impervious to bullets.

Superheroes. Action heroes. Fantasy heroes.

Power fantasies.

Is there any doubt the power fantasy of the Black man in the years following multiple assassinations of his leaders and children by way of the gun would be superhuman resistance to bullets?

In American society, the Black man has come a long way from the terrors of the past handful of centuries, only to crash right into the terrors of the 21st century. Some of those terrors being the same exact ones their grandparents had to face and survive — or not.

There are Black men who are wealthy, powerful, formidable and/or dangerous. They can affect change undreamt of by their parents, and their parents’ parents. Their children will be able to change the world in ways we can intuit and others we can barely begin to try and predict.

But a bullet can rip through their flesh and their future with no effort whatsoever.

And so we look at Luke Cage, a man who gets shot on a regular basis, whose body language is such that he is expecting to be shot at, prepared for the impact — because he knows he can take it.

And maybe, in the subconscious of the uni-mind of Marvel Comics, is the understanding that Luke Cage may unfortunately always be a relevant fantasy idea for the Black man.

2012 – Trayvon Martin is shot and killed.

2013 – Jonathan Ferrell is shot and killed.

2014 – Michael Brown is shot and killed.

2015/2016 – Luke Cage premieres on Netflix.

I look forward to seeing if the Luke Cage of that show will have a true understanding of his power and what he symbolizes.

"

Games are art. I don’t think most people will disagree with me that the medium has rightfully gained such a status—if you do disagree, you can take that up with the Smithsonian. Unlike the artworks in museums, however, games share a trait with their counterpart, film, in which they’re rated depending on the content within said games—an aspect more commonly known as an ERSB rating. While these ratings can be good for a general sense of what content someone buying a game may need to look out for, the system itself has its own shortcomings. A T or M rating might let the consumer know that there’s violence or sexually explicit content, but there’s nothing in these ratings that allow for, say, warnings of spiders. Smaller phobias, or even more descriptive break-downs of larger warnings (e.g.: distinguishing “situations of sexual assault” from “appearance of naked breasts” under the umbrella of “sexual content”) simply do not have a chance of being expressed on a small black and white box on the back of a game box. This is where today’s web crush comes in.
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Games are art. I don’t think most people will disagree with me that the medium has rightfully gained such a status—if you do disagree, you can take that up with the Smithsonian. Unlike the artworks in museums, however, games share a trait with their counterpart, film, in which they’re rated depending on the content within said games—an aspect more commonly known as an ERSB rating. While these ratings can be good for a general sense of what content someone buying a game may need to look out for, the system itself has its own shortcomings. A T or M rating might let the consumer know that there’s violence or sexually explicit content, but there’s nothing in these ratings that allow for, say, warnings of spiders. Smaller phobias, or even more descriptive break-downs of larger warnings (e.g.: distinguishing “situations of sexual assault” from “appearance of naked breasts” under the umbrella of “sexual content”) simply do not have a chance of being expressed on a small black and white box on the back of a game box. This is where today’s web crush comes in.

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cheethos:

hiccstridforever:

juliajm15:

fem!Hiccup + Astrid suggested by Anon :)

FUCK! I LOVE IT

WHAAAAAAAAAAAT oh yeah

cheethos:

hiccstridforever:

juliajm15:

fem!Hiccup + Astrid suggested by Anon :)

FUCK! I LOVE IT

WHAAAAAAAAAAAT oh yeah

grumpypedant:

I think a lot of people have trouble understanding transgender issues because they try to see themselves as trans, but come at it from the wrong direction. e. g. a cis woman tries to understand transness by going, “what if I felt like/wanted to be a man” when she should be approaching it as “what if I, a woman, was so easily mistaken for a man that I had to pretend to be one”,

And I think this is something to keep in mind and to explain away when trying to get these matters across to people who’re new to the idea.

Over the weekend, in a spectacular use of time that only goes to show how very impressive my decision-making skills are, I revisited a lot of my favorite Simon Pegg and Nick Frost collaborations. Eventually, through gratuitous use of Wikipedia, I happened upon a lesser-known film called Attack the Block, the 2011 directorial debut of Pegg and Frost collaborator Joe Cornish. Did I watch it? Yes, I did. Like Hot Fuzz and Shaun of the Dead, Attack the Block is in many ways a send-up of a popular genre (this time, alien invasions). It’s suspenseful, engaging, and hilarious. Most of all, it’s thought-provoking: it has a level of diversity that is rarely found in sci-fi, and uses its cast to make some pointed racial commentary.
Spoilers for Attack the Block below.
Read More

Over the weekend, in a spectacular use of time that only goes to show how very impressive my decision-making skills are, I revisited a lot of my favorite Simon Pegg and Nick Frost collaborations. Eventually, through gratuitous use of Wikipedia, I happened upon a lesser-known film called Attack the Block, the 2011 directorial debut of Pegg and Frost collaborator Joe Cornish. Did I watch it? Yes, I did. Like Hot Fuzz and Shaun of the Dead, Attack the Block is in many ways a send-up of a popular genre (this time, alien invasions). It’s suspenseful, engaging, and hilarious. Most of all, it’s thought-provoking: it has a level of diversity that is rarely found in sci-fi, and uses its cast to make some pointed racial commentary.

Spoilers for Attack the Block below.

Read More

lierdumoa:

iwatchforsasha:

Fantastic Breasts and Where to Find Them

That second to last panel is chilling.

I recently—finally—finished Arkham Origins, just watched Batman: Assault on Arkham, and have been reading Batman fics non-stop for the past two weeks. Needless to say, I’ve been a little obsessed. I can’t get enough of the Dark Knight. Unfortunately, Gotham doesn’t premiere until the 22nd, and that’s still like a whole week away.

A whole week.

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medievalpoc:

gryblogs:

quietlyloud-intersex:

treeofcolor:

eurotrottest:

admiral-yousmator:

You know what really gets to me, and I’m sure many know this, is the blatant abuse and betrayal that white photogs display in POC countries. Every time a photo has gotten famous like this photo did in history, the actual focus of the photo is left behind in the dust while the white photog is hailed as a hero for displaying the ills of that country. He didn’t even fucking ask her name. He didn’t ask for 17 years. The world knew nothing about her life and her story. He captured one moment that made him famous and she got nothing.
Every time I see this photo, I seethe.


whats her name though


HER NAME IS SHARBAT GULA

When I speak about forms of colonialist violence and how it shapes the way we communicate, I hope that seeing this photograph with the above commentary included helps people understand what I mean.
This is how a person becomes reduced to an idea, an image, an accomplishment for someone else. She becomes “Afghan Girl”: a two-dimensional example meant to represent something over which she has no control. Was she ever paid for this photograph, or the second one above? 

No.
Why does Steve McCurry speak for her? Why does he control the conversation, why does he control what we can know about her? Where is her voice?
Who is Sharbat Gula?

medievalpoc:

gryblogs:

quietlyloud-intersex:

treeofcolor:

eurotrottest:

admiral-yousmator:

You know what really gets to me, and I’m sure many know this, is the blatant abuse and betrayal that white photogs display in POC countries. Every time a photo has gotten famous like this photo did in history, the actual focus of the photo is left behind in the dust while the white photog is hailed as a hero for displaying the ills of that country. He didn’t even fucking ask her name. He didn’t ask for 17 years. The world knew nothing about her life and her story. He captured one moment that made him famous and she got nothing.

Every time I see this photo, I seethe.

whats her name though

HER NAME IS SHARBAT GULA

When I speak about forms of colonialist violence and how it shapes the way we communicate, I hope that seeing this photograph with the above commentary included helps people understand what I mean.

This is how a person becomes reduced to an idea, an image, an accomplishment for someone else. She becomes “Afghan Girl”: a two-dimensional example meant to represent something over which she has no control. Was she ever paid for this photograph, or the second one above?

image

No.

Why does Steve McCurry speak for her? Why does he control the conversation, why does he control what we can know about her? Where is her voice?

Who is Sharbat Gula?