bisexual-community:

Bisexual History: or how dare we describe historical figures as bisexual since … well … many didn’t speak English so they never used that word

the-curious-bisexual:

essentialisinvisible:

I get the want to have bisexual role models and figures in society. I truly do but like when you label historical figures as bisexual just because they had relationships with men and women, you are helping take away the agency of those people in the past and many people currently. You can be straight or gay and had relationships with other genders. Sexuality is fluid. It doesn’t make you bisexual to have been in relationships with men and women but if you want to identify as bi you can. This applies to historical figures as well. The only way you can label someone bisexual is if they call themselves bisexual from their own lips. Anything else and you are mislabeling people and erasing their identities, which we as bi people know all too well so please stop doing that.

But it’s not like many historical figures went round saying they were straight or gay either - so surely putting any sexuality label on a person who lived before these labels existed is mislabelling? I’m just not sure why it’s only mislabelling when we choose to label as bisexual people who clearly had attractions to more than one gender.

Also fluid sexuality is just an experience that some people have, it’s not true of everyone or an experience unique to people who could be called bisexual.

While it’s true that say Julius Caesar — a well know historic figure who carried on so much & so publicly that Gaius Scribonius Curio, another Roman consul referred to him as "every woman’s man and every man’s woman" (see Suetonius “The Lives of the First Twelve Caesars) - did not dash about referring to himself as "bisexual", it is equally true that the primary reason for this is because that famous general did not actually live in the 21st Century nor did he speak the Queen’s English.

And may we be so bold as to point out that the aboriginal inhabitants of the Americas did not actually refer to themselves as First Nations, Native Americans or AmerIndians. And frankly until sometime in the 10th Century AD no one on “this sceptred isle” called any "blessed plot" of it England either.

However it must be said that one does not frequently hear people incessantly whining that to refer to any of these latter things is ahistorical. It is merely taken as a given, that it is a convenient way to describe various common things so a modern audience might have a clue as to what you are referring to.

Since the very definition of bisexual/biromantic is those who have the ability to have a physical, romantic and/or emotional attraction to other people of various sexes and/or gender identities — as oposed to monosexuals (gay, straight or lesbian) whose attractions are only to those of a single sex and/or gender identity - it seems a bit unclear how you would want historical people who are clearly by their behavior "bisexual" to be described.

And further since sexual fluidity is simply an interesting biological "thing" found in all homosapiens and indeed probably in a great deal of the animal kingdom, but it is only something that is readily apparent in humans (who can discuss it) who are bisexual (because it can sometimes cause some people to wander back and forth across an artificial construct called the gender-line), what all does that have to do with anything, historic or otherwise? 

Or is the actual issue (as is frequently the case) that people would just as soon skip the entire subject and we can all go on pretending that everyone everywhere is all just biologically rock-solid stable cisgender and heteronormative

The trailers for Big Hero 6 have been floating around for a while, and I kept seeing it on friends’ Facebook feeds and my Tumblr dashboard. So I finally decided to watch it and see what all the hype was about. Imagine my surprise when I found out about the Asian protagonist—and a lot of racism underneath.

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potootagath:

wingleader:

wakeupslaves:

the-goddamazon:

LOL man.

never forget white people did nothing first neither the best, they sleep and eat false propaganda,

Ugh, why the shit does that have to turn into a race thing? Why does EVERYTHING have to turn into a race thing?

because white people have made sure that everything is about race
as proved by the fact that when you say explorer, you think of a bunch of white guys walking the world and discovering it ~exotic wonders~ even though Zheng He travelled through Asia, to the Middle East, and even East Africa. But you’d likely never heard of him before.
Same reason you never heard of Ahmad Ibn Fadlan, an Arab traveller who, as early as the 10th century, went to the Volga area for diplomatic reasons. He wrote about it, much as Marco Polo would do later for his own travels, and is one of our sources on what viking were like (and by all accounts, he wrote about them more accurately than western scholars of the same period did)
Oh, or Ibn Battuta who travelled throughout Africa long before europeans did, and even went to Europe himself.
And that’s just some example of Muslim medieval travel writers
Everything is about race because white people keep telling everyone that their race is the only one who every got anything done.

potootagath:

wingleader:

wakeupslaves:

the-goddamazon:

LOL man.

never forget white people did nothing first neither the best, they sleep and eat false propaganda,

Ugh, why the shit does that have to turn into a race thing? Why does EVERYTHING have to turn into a race thing?

because white people have made sure that everything is about race

as proved by the fact that when you say explorer, you think of a bunch of white guys walking the world and discovering it ~exotic wonders~ even though Zheng He travelled through Asia, to the Middle East, and even East Africa. But you’d likely never heard of him before.

Same reason you never heard of Ahmad Ibn Fadlan, an Arab traveller who, as early as the 10th century, went to the Volga area for diplomatic reasons. He wrote about it, much as Marco Polo would do later for his own travels, and is one of our sources on what viking were like (and by all accounts, he wrote about them more accurately than western scholars of the same period did)

Oh, or Ibn Battuta who travelled throughout Africa long before europeans did, and even went to Europe himself.

And that’s just some example of Muslim medieval travel writers

Everything is about race because white people keep telling everyone that their race is the only one who every got anything done.

Werewolves have never really been the most popular monster; they’re usually second fiddle to vampires or zombies. I suppose there’s some sense to that. Vampires are sexy romantics and zombie hoards are harbingers of the apocalypse. Werewolves usually act alone, and, outside of Twilight and Teen Wolf, aren’t typically portrayed as having much sex appeal. In 1941, The Wolf Man became the first successful werewolf film. Our monster has a furry face, spreads his affliction through biting others, kills people, and is ultimately killed by his own silver walking stick. He’s monstrous, not sexy.  We can understand why vampires and zombies scare us, too. Vampires might represent a powerful person draining us of our own power for personal gain. Zombies drawn on our fear of pandemics and the ignorant masses destroying those of us just trying to survive. But what about werewolves? The most common answer I find is that werewolves speak to the changes a teenager experiences during puberty. Pisces already explored how this dynamic works in Teen Wolf. But if that’s the case, then where are all the female werewolves?
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Werewolves have never really been the most popular monster; they’re usually second fiddle to vampires or zombies. I suppose there’s some sense to that. Vampires are sexy romantics and zombie hoards are harbingers of the apocalypse. Werewolves usually act alone, and, outside of Twilight and Teen Wolf, aren’t typically portrayed as having much sex appeal. In 1941, The Wolf Man became the first successful werewolf film. Our monster has a furry face, spreads his affliction through biting others, kills people, and is ultimately killed by his own silver walking stick. He’s monstrous, not sexy.  We can understand why vampires and zombies scare us, too. Vampires might represent a powerful person draining us of our own power for personal gain. Zombies drawn on our fear of pandemics and the ignorant masses destroying those of us just trying to survive. But what about werewolves? The most common answer I find is that werewolves speak to the changes a teenager experiences during puberty. Pisces already explored how this dynamic works in Teen Wolf. But if that’s the case, then where are all the female werewolves?

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theaubisticagenda:

commanderfraya:

commanderfraya:

ok but:  child autistic prince zuko stimming with firebending and accidentally burning things down

u think im joking but nothing is as important as autistic prince zuko

  • autistic zuko who cant for the life of him figure out why he has so much trouble communicating n struggling with some super anxiety over it bc that’s canon
  • autistic zuko who attaches so much importance to his honor bc he’s terrified he won’t be worth anything without it (also canon)
  • autistic zuko figuring out how to relate to other people in a way that doesnt make him sound like a raging dick all the time (canon)
  • autistic zuko not being sure what to do about friendships and actually being loved (canon)
  • autistic zuko learning that his destiny is his own and evolves independently of the tyranny of the fire nation and doing his best to make up for his past mistakes (canon)
  • autistic zuko scripting conversations before having them and trying fifteen different ways to say the same thing (canon)

like pls make room for autistic zuko interpretations in ur life this is something that was only revealed to me like two days ago but is so important

autistic zuko’s older sister being a giant dick to him and not presuming his competence (canon)

Acts of true love are everywhere in our fiction. In many of these narratives, performing an act of true love—such as a kiss—has the magical ability to save someone from certain death brought about by a curse. In many older Disney films and fairy tale stories, true love is almost always portrayed as romantic. Recently, though, we’ve gotten a few new interpretations on the mythos. In the new Sleeping Beauty movie, Maleficent, a platonic kiss Maleficent gives Aurora saves her life. And in Once Upon A Time, Emma saves her son Henry with a motherly kiss on his forehead. Then there’s Frozen, which, between the sisters Anna and Elsa, gives us yet another interpretation of true love, one that I like far more.
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Acts of true love are everywhere in our fiction. In many of these narratives, performing an act of true love—such as a kiss—has the magical ability to save someone from certain death brought about by a curse. In many older Disney films and fairy tale stories, true love is almost always portrayed as romantic. Recently, though, we’ve gotten a few new interpretations on the mythos. In the new Sleeping Beauty movie, Maleficent, a platonic kiss Maleficent gives Aurora saves her life. And in Once Upon A Time, Emma saves her son Henry with a motherly kiss on his forehead. Then there’s Frozen, which, between the sisters Anna and Elsa, gives us yet another interpretation of true love, one that I like far more.

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homewreckingwhore:

bluhbluhhugedork:

and this is why we cosplay

those two dudes made each other’s days.

copacetic:

cubebreaker:

E-Nabling the Future is an organization of volunteers who produce 3D-printed prosthetic superhero arms for kids in need.

This is bloody brilliant!

For your Halloween pleasure, I am providing my Top 5 most terrifying female villains in geek TV shows. These are the women who you would not want to meet in a dark alley or in a brightly lit park, because no matter what, they’ll probably fucking kill you and laugh while they do it. Why only five? Well, sadly there aren’t as many female villains as there are male ones, especially in TV shows, and more often than not, they are shown to be just vain and petty rather than pure terrifying evil. For this list I chose ladies who seem to legitimately enjoy being evil and show little to no remorse for their actions. This does not necessarily mean that they have less depth or are less interesting; they are just the female characters you love to hate. I am also only sticking to one villainess per TV show. So with that in mind, let’s begin!
Trigger warnings for mentions of rape, torture, and abuse after the jump.
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For your Halloween pleasure, I am providing my Top 5 most terrifying female villains in geek TV shows. These are the women who you would not want to meet in a dark alley or in a brightly lit park, because no matter what, they’ll probably fucking kill you and laugh while they do it. Why only five? Well, sadly there aren’t as many female villains as there are male ones, especially in TV shows, and more often than not, they are shown to be just vain and petty rather than pure terrifying evil. For this list I chose ladies who seem to legitimately enjoy being evil and show little to no remorse for their actions. This does not necessarily mean that they have less depth or are less interesting; they are just the female characters you love to hate. I am also only sticking to one villainess per TV show. So with that in mind, let’s begin!

Trigger warnings for mentions of rape, torture, and abuse after the jump.

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