"We will sing to you, Doctor. The universe will sing you to your sleep. This song is ending. But the story never ends."

There’s nothing I love more than seeing how people interact with their canon of choice. Art, writing, cosplay: every piece of output from fandom I find incredible as well as inspiring—if anyone is touched by something so much that it drives them to create, well, there’s something beautiful about that. And while I have an appreciation for most of these things, I will admit that I have my biases. By some stroke of luck, I managed to find my main bias combined with one of my fandoms in this week’s web crush.
As evident by my post from a couple weeks ago and (less evidently) by the fact my brother and I have been marathoning the re-release of Tales of Symphonia, the Tales games and fandom are both things that I hold close to my heart. Beyond the excruciating satisfaction of one hundred percenting the games, one of my favorite aspects of these games is the cooking system. I got cheated out of it in Tales of Xillia—buying pre-made foods isn’t as fun no matter what bonuses you give them!!—but there’s something really fun in the simplicity of buying ingredients and watching your party members get better at cooking as you go through the game.
Even finding recipes in their hidden locations scattered across the game’s world can be a journey in and of itself, adding more to an already expansive universe. Given such a mechanic, it was only a matter of time before someone decided to document their attempts at making these recipes in real life. I’ve already featured one site like this, but given my return to the fandom, I found it only appropriate to feature Tales of Cooking.
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There’s nothing I love more than seeing how people interact with their canon of choice. Art, writing, cosplay: every piece of output from fandom I find incredible as well as inspiring—if anyone is touched by something so much that it drives them to create, well, there’s something beautiful about that. And while I have an appreciation for most of these things, I will admit that I have my biases. By some stroke of luck, I managed to find my main bias combined with one of my fandoms in this week’s web crush.

As evident by my post from a couple weeks ago and (less evidently) by the fact my brother and I have been marathoning the re-release of Tales of Symphonia, the Tales games and fandom are both things that I hold close to my heart. Beyond the excruciating satisfaction of one hundred percenting the games, one of my favorite aspects of these games is the cooking system. I got cheated out of it in Tales of Xillia—buying pre-made foods isn’t as fun no matter what bonuses you give them!!—but there’s something really fun in the simplicity of buying ingredients and watching your party members get better at cooking as you go through the game.

Even finding recipes in their hidden locations scattered across the game’s world can be a journey in and of itself, adding more to an already expansive universe. Given such a mechanic, it was only a matter of time before someone decided to document their attempts at making these recipes in real life. I’ve already featured one site like this, but given my return to the fandom, I found it only appropriate to feature Tales of Cooking.

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sucysucyfivedolla:

Social Justice Warrior?? okay but we’re gonna need a Social Justice Thief and a Social Justice Cleric cuz I’m a Social Justice Witch and don’t have party heals. Might need a Social Justice Paladin if the war isn’t specced into defense plus maybe another Social Justice DPS to round the party out

This past semester I’ve been super busy—I’m a full-time student with two jobs and an internship—and since I don’t have time for much of anything anymore, I decided it was a good idea to start procrastinating what I need to get done by replaying Final Fantasy XIII. I never really went into a full review for the game, though I did talk about its sequel a while back. To recap what I’ve already said, FFXIII doesn’t have the best storytelling. The plot itself is fine and rather compelling, but it wasn’t told in the best way. Additionally, the game is very linear until Chapter 11—you are quite literally on a single path that you cannot deviate from for the first ten hours or so of gameplay, and you are also incapable of returning to earlier parts of that path once you’ve moved on—which a lot of people didn’t like, including me.
However, one thing that I really think this game excelled at, and which helps me forgive a lot of its shortcomings, is the character development. There are still problems in this regard—I like Lightning, but she’s still just a carbon-copy of Cloud from FFVII—but for the most part, I really enjoyed the characterization here. One character that I was particularly pleased with is Hope.
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This past semester I’ve been super busy—I’m a full-time student with two jobs and an internship—and since I don’t have time for much of anything anymore, I decided it was a good idea to start procrastinating what I need to get done by replaying Final Fantasy XIII. I never really went into a full review for the game, though I did talk about its sequel a while back. To recap what I’ve already said, FFXIII doesn’t have the best storytelling. The plot itself is fine and rather compelling, but it wasn’t told in the best way. Additionally, the game is very linear until Chapter 11—you are quite literally on a single path that you cannot deviate from for the first ten hours or so of gameplay, and you are also incapable of returning to earlier parts of that path once you’ve moved on—which a lot of people didn’t like, including me.

However, one thing that I really think this game excelled at, and which helps me forgive a lot of its shortcomings, is the character development. There are still problems in this regard—I like Lightning, but she’s still just a carbon-copy of Cloud from FFVII—but for the most part, I really enjoyed the characterization here. One character that I was particularly pleased with is Hope.

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GoT meme | Characters [3/10] → Arya Stark

 ”It’s just a stupid sword,” she said, aloud this time… but it wasn’t. Needle was Robb and Bran and Rickon, her mother and her father, even Sansa. Needle was Winterfell’s grey walls, and the laughter of its people. Needle was the summer snows, Old Nan’s stories, the heart tree with its red leaves and scary face, the warm earthy smell of the glass gardens, the sound of the north wind rattling the shutters of her room. Needle was Jon Snow’s smile.

"Since her death in 1979, the woman who discovered what the universe is made of has not so much as received a memorial plaque. Her newspaper obituaries do not mention her greatest discovery. […] Every high school student knows that Isaac Newton discovered gravity, that Charles Darwin discovered evolution, and that Albert Einstein discovered the relativity of time. But when it comes to the composition of our universe, the textbooks simply say that the most abundant atom in the universe is hydrogen. And no one ever wonders how we know."

Jeremy Knowles, discussing the complete lack of recognition Cecilia Payne gets, even today, for her revolutionary discovery (via hollow-gram)
I have a confession to make: although I was excited to hear that the wonderful Noelle Stevenson (Tumblr’s gingerhaze) was going to be writing a comic about a bunch of girls at summer camp getting into paranormal mischief, for some reason I made a conscious decision not to preorder it. I think at the time I had just dropped Kelly Sue DeConnick’s Pretty Deadly (I found the concept cool but the comic itself incomprehensible) and I was anxious about picking up another lady-created book solely on the merits of its lady-createdness. Anyway, Lumberjanes finally hit shelves a few weeks ago, and when I went into my comics store early Wednesday afternoon, I discovered that there was only one copy left. On a whim, I grabbed it. No harm in giving the first issue a try, right?
Well, let me tell you what: it was awesome. I didn’t realize I was missing a comic that encapsulated the concept “Girl Scouts meets Gravity Falls" from my life until I had that very book in my hands.
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I have a confession to make: although I was excited to hear that the wonderful Noelle Stevenson (Tumblr’s gingerhaze) was going to be writing a comic about a bunch of girls at summer camp getting into paranormal mischief, for some reason I made a conscious decision not to preorder it. I think at the time I had just dropped Kelly Sue DeConnick’s Pretty Deadly (I found the concept cool but the comic itself incomprehensible) and I was anxious about picking up another lady-created book solely on the merits of its lady-createdness. Anyway, Lumberjanes finally hit shelves a few weeks ago, and when I went into my comics store early Wednesday afternoon, I discovered that there was only one copy left. On a whim, I grabbed it. No harm in giving the first issue a try, right?

Well, let me tell you what: it was awesome. I didn’t realize I was missing a comic that encapsulated the concept “Girl Scouts meets Gravity Falls" from my life until I had that very book in my hands.

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liminal-zone:

CRYING TEARS.

Last month, the U.S. cover for Garth Nix’s long, long-awaited book, Clariel, finally hit the internet. For those of you who don’t know, Clariel is a prequel to Nix’s Old Kingdom trilogy, and it may just answer some questions about how the magic in in the series works. Free Magic? The Charter? From the very first page of the very first book, Nix launches his readers into a fully-realized world which he, infuriatingly enough, never fully explains. All the rules appear to be there, and Nix knows all of them — but we don’t. Until now… maybe.
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Last month, the U.S. cover for Garth Nix’s long, long-awaited book, Clariel, finally hit the internet. For those of you who don’t know, Clariel is a prequel to Nix’s Old Kingdom trilogy, and it may just answer some questions about how the magic in in the series works. Free Magic? The Charter? From the very first page of the very first book, Nix launches his readers into a fully-realized world which he, infuriatingly enough, never fully explains. All the rules appear to be there, and Nix knows all of them — but we don’t. Until now… maybe.

Read More